When is a homosexual predator not a homosexual predator? When he is a priest abusing an R.C. boy!

SPOTLIGHT THE BIGOT’S SUB-PLOT IN A DODGY PAEDO-MOVIE 

by Bill Donohue, Editor of Catholic League for Civil and Religious Rights.

The movie “Spotlight” is bound to spark more conversation about the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church. Unfortunately, much of what the American public knows about this issue is derived from the popular culture, something this film will only abet. Therefore, the time is ripe to revisit what the actual data on this subject reveals.

When the Boston Globe sent the nation reeling in 2002 with revelations of priestly sexual abuse, and the attendant cover-up, Catholics were outraged by the level of betrayal. This certainly included the Catholic League. The scandal cannot be denied. What is being denied, however, is the existence of another scandal—the relentless effort to keep the abuse crisis alive, and the deliberate refusal to come to grips with its origins. Both scandals deserve our attention.

Myth: The Scandal Never Ended 

When interviewed about the scandal in 2002 by the New York Times, I said, “I am not the church’s water boy. I am not here to defend the indefensible.” In the Catholic League’s 2002 Annual Report, I even defended the media. “The Boston Globe, the Boston Herald, and the New York Times covered the story with professionalism,” I wrote.

Scandal II was external, the result of indefensible cherry-picking of old cases by rapacious lawyers and vindictive victims’ groups. They were aided and abetted by activists, the media, and Hollywood.

A decade later things had changed. In the Catholic League’s 2011 Annual Report, I offered a critical assessment of the media. “In a nutshell,” I said, “what changed was this: in 2011, unlike what happened in 2002, virtually all the stories were about accusations against priests dating back decades, sometimes as long as a half-century ago. Keep in mind that not only were most of the priests old and infirm, many were dead; thus, only one side of the story could be told. Adding to our anger was the fact that no other institution, religious or secular, was being targeted for old allegations.”

It became clear that by 2011 we were dealing with two scandals, not one. Scandal I was internal—the church-driven scandal. This was the result of indefensible decisions by the clergy: predatory priests and their enabling bishops. Scandal II was external, the result of indefensible cherry-picking of old cases by rapacious lawyers and vindictive victims’ groups. They were aided and abetted by activists, the media, and Hollywood.

Education, education, education, and how sinister political ideology can befuddle children’s minds

What’s wrong with this statement: Just because private schools do better than State schools it doesn’t follow that working class people are less intelligent than rich parents.

  1. That somebody was daft enough to utter it?teacher-clipart-ncE74e57i
  2. That it exemplifies a silly non-sequitur?
  3. It assumes that material success indicates a high IQ?
  4. It presumes that working people are unintelligent
  5. It patronises tradesmen and craftsmen.
  6. It betrays a confused mindset steeped in Darwinian prejudices.

Obviously you got all six correct. But there is something else so very wrong with the remark that it’s worth a few moments reflection and, perhaps, a re-assessment of the depth to which standards in public debate have plunged since ADTB (anno drato Tony Blairo). The person who contrived to skew so many considerations in a few (carefully chosen?) public pronouncements seemed to take it for granted that our nation is riven by a form of warfare being fought out between those British people who are willing to pay punitive fees to ensure a decent education for their children and another set of British people, many of whom are professionals, who with the best will in the world simply cannot afford to, and must send their kids to the local primary and then high school.